4G/5G infrastructure Market 2020 Global Industry – Key Players, Size, Trends, Opportunities, Growth- Analysis to 2026

4G/5G infrastructure Market 2020 Global Industry – Key Players, Size, Trends, Opportunities, Growth- Analysis to 2026

4G/5G infrastructure Market 2020 Global Industry – Key Players, Size, Trends, Opportunities, Growth- Analysis to 2026

Global 4G/5G infrastructure Market 2020
Wiseguyreports.Com Publish New Market Research Report On-“4G/5G infrastructure Market 2020 Global Analysis, Size, Share, Trends, Opportunities and Growth, Forecast 2026”

4G/5G infrastructure Market 2020

Market Overview
The historical market value for the year 2020, along with the upcoming market value for the year 2026 is defined in the market report. The value and volume of the 4G/5G infrastructure market are defined in the 4G/5G infrastructure market report at global, regional, and company levels. The global 4G/5G infrastructure market is defined in the market report along with the strategies of the companies. It provides the overall information of the 4G/5G infrastructure market at various levels and phases.

 

Request Free Sample Report @ https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/4890556-global-4g-5g-infrastructure-market-size-status-and-forecast-2020-2026

 

Key Players
The various names, outlook, company profiles, manufacturing sites, market value, market shares, production capacity, consumption, market status of the major players or the companies are present in the global 4G/5G infrastructure market report. The various challenges faced by the major players of the 4G/5G infrastructure are defined in the market report. The solutions for those challenges faced are also defined in the 4G/5G infrastructure market report. The strategies that are followed by some of the major players in their way to success in the 4G/5G infrastructure market are also defined in the market.

The top players covered in 4G/5G infrastructure Oracle
Qualcomm (US)
Intel (US)
Ericsson (SE)
Samsung (KR)
NEC (JP)
Mediatek (TW)
Cisco (US)
Marvell
Qorvo (US)
Huawei (CN)
Market segment by Type, the product can be split into
Femtocell
Pico Cell
Micro Cell
Macro Cell

Market challenges
The report highlights both the positive and negative changes happening in the 4G/5G infrastructure markets. The report talks about the various challenges that are faced by some major companies present in the 4G/5G infrastructure market. The report provides information about some of the challenges like varying market value of the 4G/5G infrastructure market, changing trends of the market, changing the behaviour of manufacture and customers, and online and offline sales marketing. The CAGR rate is also defined in the 4G/5G infrastructure market for the forecast period 2020-2026.

Market segments
The segments of the 4G/5G infrastructure market are done based on product types along with the applications of those products. There are varieties of products in the 4G/5G infrastructure market. The report contains the names and descriptions of the 4G/5G infrastructure market products. The segmentation made on the grounds of the geographical area provides information on the 4G/5G infrastructure markets in the various regions. The segmentation based on the regions is made after studying the local and the international 4G/5G infrastructure market at every phase. Some of the major regions that are considered in the global study of the 4G/5G infrastructure markets are India, Russia, Germany, North America, Korea, South America, Latin America, Japan, China, Italy, and Southeast Asia.

Research Methodology
The tools such as Porter’s five force model are used to analyze the 4G/5G infrastructure market both qualitatively and quantitatively in the market report of the 4G/5G infrastructure market. The analysis of the market provides market value, market status, and overall information about the 4G/5G infrastructure market. The SWOT analysis is done to find the Strength, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of the 4G/5G infrastructure market at various levels. The market experts have used primary and secondary research mechanisms to research the global 4G/5G infrastructure market at every phase. The market experts have analyzed the historical market data along with the future aspects of the 4G/5G infrastructure markets to provide the overall market size of the 4G/5G infrastructure market at every phase of the market.

 

For Customisation and Query @ https://www.wiseguyreports.com/enquiry/4890556-global-4g-5g-infrastructure-market-size-status-and-forecast-2020-2026

 

Table of Contents –Analysis of Key Points

1 4G/5G infrastructure Market Overview 

2 Company Profiles 

3 Global 4G/5G infrastructure Market Competition, by Players 

4 Global 4G/5G infrastructure Market Size by Regions 

5 North America 4G/5G infrastructure Revenue by Countries 

6 Europe 4G/5G infrastructure Revenue by Countries 

7 Asia-Pacific 4G/5G infrastructure Revenue by Countries 

8 South America 4G/5G infrastructure Revenue by Countries 

9 Middle East and Africa Revenue 4G/5G infrastructure by Countries 

10 Global 4G/5G infrastructure Market Segment by Type 

11 Global 4G/5G infrastructure Market Segment by Application 

12 Global 4G/5G infrastructure Market Size Forecast (2020-2026) 

13 Research Findings and Conclusion 

14 Appendix 

List of Tables and Figures

Continued….

Media Contact
Company Name: Wiseguyreports.com
Contact Person: Norah Trent
Email: Send Email
Phone: +1 646 845 9349, +44 208 133 9349
City: Pune
State: Maharashtra
Country: India
Website: https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/4241348-global-online-car-rental-software-market-2019-by

4G/5G infrastructure Market 2020 Global Industry – Key Players, Size, Trends, Opportunities, Growth- Analysis to 2026

4G/5G infrastructure Market 2020 Global Industry – Key Players, Size, Trends, Opportunities, Growth- Analysis to 2026

4G/5G infrastructure Market 2020 Global Industry – Key Players, Size, Trends, Opportunities, Growth- Analysis to 2026

Global 4G/5G infrastructure Market 2020
Wiseguyreports.Com Publish New Market Research Report On-“4G/5G infrastructure Market 2020 Global Analysis, Size, Share, Trends, Opportunities and Growth, Forecast 2026”

4G/5G infrastructure Market 2020

Market Overview
The historical market value for the year 2020, along with the upcoming market value for the year 2026 is defined in the market report. The value and volume of the 4G/5G infrastructure market are defined in the 4G/5G infrastructure market report at global, regional, and company levels. The global 4G/5G infrastructure market is defined in the market report along with the strategies of the companies. It provides the overall information of the 4G/5G infrastructure market at various levels and phases.

 

Request Free Sample Report @ https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/4890556-global-4g-5g-infrastructure-market-size-status-and-forecast-2020-2026

 

Key Players
The various names, outlook, company profiles, manufacturing sites, market value, market shares, production capacity, consumption, market status of the major players or the companies are present in the global 4G/5G infrastructure market report. The various challenges faced by the major players of the 4G/5G infrastructure are defined in the market report. The solutions for those challenges faced are also defined in the 4G/5G infrastructure market report. The strategies that are followed by some of the major players in their way to success in the 4G/5G infrastructure market are also defined in the market.

The top players covered in 4G/5G infrastructure Oracle
Qualcomm (US)
Intel (US)
Ericsson (SE)
Samsung (KR)
NEC (JP)
Mediatek (TW)
Cisco (US)
Marvell
Qorvo (US)
Huawei (CN)
Market segment by Type, the product can be split into
Femtocell
Pico Cell
Micro Cell
Macro Cell

Market challenges
The report highlights both the positive and negative changes happening in the 4G/5G infrastructure markets. The report talks about the various challenges that are faced by some major companies present in the 4G/5G infrastructure market. The report provides information about some of the challenges like varying market value of the 4G/5G infrastructure market, changing trends of the market, changing the behaviour of manufacture and customers, and online and offline sales marketing. The CAGR rate is also defined in the 4G/5G infrastructure market for the forecast period 2020-2026.

Market segments
The segments of the 4G/5G infrastructure market are done based on product types along with the applications of those products. There are varieties of products in the 4G/5G infrastructure market. The report contains the names and descriptions of the 4G/5G infrastructure market products. The segmentation made on the grounds of the geographical area provides information on the 4G/5G infrastructure markets in the various regions. The segmentation based on the regions is made after studying the local and the international 4G/5G infrastructure market at every phase. Some of the major regions that are considered in the global study of the 4G/5G infrastructure markets are India, Russia, Germany, North America, Korea, South America, Latin America, Japan, China, Italy, and Southeast Asia.

Research Methodology
The tools such as Porter’s five force model are used to analyze the 4G/5G infrastructure market both qualitatively and quantitatively in the market report of the 4G/5G infrastructure market. The analysis of the market provides market value, market status, and overall information about the 4G/5G infrastructure market. The SWOT analysis is done to find the Strength, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of the 4G/5G infrastructure market at various levels. The market experts have used primary and secondary research mechanisms to research the global 4G/5G infrastructure market at every phase. The market experts have analyzed the historical market data along with the future aspects of the 4G/5G infrastructure markets to provide the overall market size of the 4G/5G infrastructure market at every phase of the market.

 

For Customisation and Query @ https://www.wiseguyreports.com/enquiry/4890556-global-4g-5g-infrastructure-market-size-status-and-forecast-2020-2026

 

Table of Contents –Analysis of Key Points

1 4G/5G infrastructure Market Overview 

2 Company Profiles 

3 Global 4G/5G infrastructure Market Competition, by Players 

4 Global 4G/5G infrastructure Market Size by Regions 

5 North America 4G/5G infrastructure Revenue by Countries 

6 Europe 4G/5G infrastructure Revenue by Countries 

7 Asia-Pacific 4G/5G infrastructure Revenue by Countries 

8 South America 4G/5G infrastructure Revenue by Countries 

9 Middle East and Africa Revenue 4G/5G infrastructure by Countries 

10 Global 4G/5G infrastructure Market Segment by Type 

11 Global 4G/5G infrastructure Market Segment by Application 

12 Global 4G/5G infrastructure Market Size Forecast (2020-2026) 

13 Research Findings and Conclusion 

14 Appendix 

List of Tables and Figures

Continued….

Media Contact
Company Name: Wiseguyreports.com
Contact Person: Norah Trent
Email: Send Email
Phone: +1 646 845 9349, +44 208 133 9349
City: Pune
State: Maharashtra
Country: India
Website: https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/4241348-global-online-car-rental-software-market-2019-by

Flywire’s Massaro: Healthcare Payments’ $375B Efficiency Opportunity

According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, healthcare expenditures in the U.S. are expected to approach $6 trillion by 2027, with an annual growth rate that will eclipse GDP growth for that same period. That may not come as much of a surprise.

What may be surprising, however, is the share of those expenditures that are borne by the consumer.

In 2018, that was 28.4 percent, making the patient (along with the federal government at 28.3 percent) the largest healthcare payors in the U.S. That amounted to approximately $375 billion. Roughly 2 percent, or $7.5 billion, of those out-of-pocket costs, go totally unpaid, according to PYMNTS’ research, because consumers haven’t been offered an option that matches their willingness to pay with their ability to make those payments. Another 15 percent of total healthcare costs are attributed to billing and payment inefficiencies.

Those inefficiencies, combined with the growing share of healthcare costs that are borne by the patient, as Flywire CEO Mike Massaro told Karen Webster in a recent conversation, is the latest evidence that healthcare payment dynamics have shifted more rapidly than the providers’ ability to adapt.

“Providers who used to collect 5 percent of their overall payments from the patient are now looking at collecting a minimum of 30 percent – and they just don’t have the payments infrastructure to adapt to that,” Massaro said, noting that trend will continue as more consumers are electing to pay out of pocket – whether that’s because their care is elective, they want to use money to preserve a high level of service or choice, or they are choosing a deductible plan that requires more direct consumer investment.

But where there is a hole leaking billions of dollars in inefficiency, there is an opportunity for a firm like Flywire to step in, Massaro emphasized. The recent acquisition of healthcare tech startup Simplee, combined with the 2018 acquisition of OnPlan and its consumer-facing healthcare payments platform, makes Flywire a serious contender to leverage its end-to-end payment capabilities in healthcare payments, he said.

“In healthcare, you have a lot of people trying to go into the market, but there isn’t a leader,” Massaro remarked. “Healthcare [payments] is messy and confusing – success for providers and the patients they serve requires a lot more specialization than simple merchant acquiring and processing.”

Consolidating the Clutter Away 

Flywire’s major interest as it pushes deeper into healthcare, Massaro said, remains nearly identical to what it was when it entered the market as a tiny startup trying to fix higher education and healthcare payments around the world: simplifying the payments and receivable process for the biller so they can match payments to the bills they send out.

For Flywire, that means making it more efficient for the consumer to make those payments. In the case of healthcare payments, instead of having “a million customer integrations” with insurance company payors who are sending payments to providers, Flywire is targeting the consumer payor, who now represents 30 percent (and growing) of provider healthcare spend.

What Flywire and Simplee combine into a single package is a consumer-facing front end and a fully enabled, vertically specific backend that can streamline end-to-end payment complexities for providers.

A provider is able to offer the consumer a relevant payment plan for services upfront, instead of chasing them down as part of a collections process or having the consumer forego what could be a necessary medical procedure. On the receivables side, the Flywire platform streamlines payments reconciliation and matches the payment with the provider’s bill, including the movement of funds directly into the provider’s account without further integration.

“We are able to use our [payments] network to streamline a lot of the challenges for providers who touch payments as part of their offering but don’t specialize in them,” said Massaro.

The integration of Simplee into the Flywire healthcare payments platform will take roughly six to nine months to complete, he added.

The Faster Road Forward 

In five years, Massaro noted, healthcare payments will hopefully look quite a bit different than they do today, as digital and mobile technology accelerates the pace of innovation in the sector, forcing payors and providers to adapt.

In 2018, at $375 billion, out-of-pocket healthcare spending was two-thirds the size of the eCommerce market, and the possibility exists that healthcare spend could easily outpace it over that period of time. Massaro said that as the consumer’s share of healthcare spend continues to rise, billing will have to become a lot more transparent, and the payments experience will have to look more and more like any other digital transaction – otherwise, consumers might take their business to other providers who offer a more integrated payments and services experience.

“There is a lot of good software, and an industry that is calling out for an end-to-end, modernized payments process,” he said. “We can’t wait to really start building it.”

The announcement of the Simplee acquisition also included news of an additional $120 million capital raise. Other than the integration, Massaro noted that the rest of the funds will go toward growing their staff, particularly in healthcare, and expanding their global footprint.

Flywire’s Massaro: Healthcare Payments’ $375B Efficiency Opportunity

According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, healthcare expenditures in the U.S. are expected to approach $6 trillion by 2027, with an annual growth rate that will eclipse GDP growth for that same period. That may not come as much of a surprise.

What may be surprising, however, is the share of those expenditures that are borne by the consumer.

In 2018, that was 28.4 percent, making the patient (along with the federal government at 28.3 percent) the largest healthcare payors in the U.S. That amounted to approximately $375 billion. Roughly 2 percent, or $7.5 billion, of those out-of-pocket costs, go totally unpaid, according to PYMNTS’ research, because consumers haven’t been offered an option that matches their willingness to pay with their ability to make those payments. Another 15 percent of total healthcare costs are attributed to billing and payment inefficiencies.

Those inefficiencies, combined with the growing share of healthcare costs that are borne by the patient, as Flywire CEO Mike Massaro told Karen Webster in a recent conversation, is the latest evidence that healthcare payment dynamics have shifted more rapidly than the providers’ ability to adapt.

“Providers who used to collect 5 percent of their overall payments from the patient are now looking at collecting a minimum of 30 percent – and they just don’t have the payments infrastructure to adapt to that,” Massaro said, noting that trend will continue as more consumers are electing to pay out of pocket – whether that’s because their care is elective, they want to use money to preserve a high level of service or choice, or they are choosing a deductible plan that requires more direct consumer investment.

But where there is a hole leaking billions of dollars in inefficiency, there is an opportunity for a firm like Flywire to step in, Massaro emphasized. The recent acquisition of healthcare tech startup Simplee, combined with the 2018 acquisition of OnPlan and its consumer-facing healthcare payments platform, makes Flywire a serious contender to leverage its end-to-end payment capabilities in healthcare payments, he said.

“In healthcare, you have a lot of people trying to go into the market, but there isn’t a leader,” Massaro remarked. “Healthcare [payments] is messy and confusing – success for providers and the patients they serve requires a lot more specialization than simple merchant acquiring and processing.”

Consolidating the Clutter Away 

Flywire’s major interest as it pushes deeper into healthcare, Massaro said, remains nearly identical to what it was when it entered the market as a tiny startup trying to fix higher education and healthcare payments around the world: simplifying the payments and receivable process for the biller so they can match payments to the bills they send out.

For Flywire, that means making it more efficient for the consumer to make those payments. In the case of healthcare payments, instead of having “a million customer integrations” with insurance company payors who are sending payments to providers, Flywire is targeting the consumer payor, who now represents 30 percent (and growing) of provider healthcare spend.

What Flywire and Simplee combine into a single package is a consumer-facing front end and a fully enabled, vertically specific backend that can streamline end-to-end payment complexities for providers.

A provider is able to offer the consumer a relevant payment plan for services upfront, instead of chasing them down as part of a collections process or having the consumer forego what could be a necessary medical procedure. On the receivables side, the Flywire platform streamlines payments reconciliation and matches the payment with the provider’s bill, including the movement of funds directly into the provider’s account without further integration.

“We are able to use our [payments] network to streamline a lot of the challenges for providers who touch payments as part of their offering but don’t specialize in them,” said Massaro.

The integration of Simplee into the Flywire healthcare payments platform will take roughly six to nine months to complete, he added.

The Faster Road Forward 

In five years, Massaro noted, healthcare payments will hopefully look quite a bit different than they do today, as digital and mobile technology accelerates the pace of innovation in the sector, forcing payors and providers to adapt.

In 2018, at $375 billion, out-of-pocket healthcare spending was two-thirds the size of the eCommerce market, and the possibility exists that healthcare spend could easily outpace it over that period of time. Massaro said that as the consumer’s share of healthcare spend continues to rise, billing will have to become a lot more transparent, and the payments experience will have to look more and more like any other digital transaction – otherwise, consumers might take their business to other providers who offer a more integrated payments and services experience.

“There is a lot of good software, and an industry that is calling out for an end-to-end, modernized payments process,” he said. “We can’t wait to really start building it.”

The announcement of the Simplee acquisition also included news of an additional $120 million capital raise. Other than the integration, Massaro noted that the rest of the funds will go toward growing their staff, particularly in healthcare, and expanding their global footprint.

The $500B Consumer Lifestyle Opportunity Credit Unions Are Missing

Credit unions (CUs) have a bit of asymmetry in their relationships with their customers. On one hand, as PYMNTS data shows, customers very much like their credit unions, and are loyal to them. PYMNTS found that 65 percent of members chose their CUs because they trusted them, 58.4 percent reported being “extremely” satisfied with them and 60.8 percent said they would not leave their CUs for different financial institutions (FIs).

The problem is that while customers might be perfectly satisfied with their credit unions, they are still stepping out on them – the majority of members say that their primary relationship is with another financial services provider.

And that is an indication that it’s time for credit unions to start thinking differently, Samantha Paxson, chief experience officer at CO-OP Financial Services, told Karen Webster in the latest edition of the PYMNTS Masterclass Series. As she pointed out, they need to think differently about payments, about digitization and about how they are actively building to meet their customers’ needs and expectations.

“The future is in understanding your customer, what they are trying to do, and then designing solutions for the day-to-day member lifestyle – because that is how you create greater engagement,” Paxson told Webster.

Centralizing The Payments Experience

The historical focus of credit unions has been consumer lending, with a focus on providing the lowest rates to customers. That’s a perfectly good bedrock upon which to build their mission, Paxson said – but what CUs have been slower to understand is that in the intersection between lending and day-to-day lifestyle connections, there lies a payments opportunity.

As a result, she said, although credit unions are offering credit card products, they aren’t a central focus. At best, they are often relegated to the status of a sideline revenue channel. That is evident in the difference between the top three banks, where credit cards represent roughly 26 percent of loan volume, and credit unions, where they represent a little over 6 percent.

“There is a massive tendency toward ‘setting it and forgetting it’ somewhere on the side, despite the fact that it is both an important strategic growth driver and an engagement,” said Paxson.

Today, that means leaving $500 billion in incremental revenue on the table, she noted – a figure that will swell to north of $1 trillion before the end of the decade. And perhaps more important than the dollars-and-cents revenue loss is the missed opportunity to make daily connections with customers. Like most working people, Paxson told Webster, by 9:35 in the morning, she has already used her payment card six separate times in a mix of in-person, mobile and web-based transactions. Among the best places for an FI to gain insight into its customer base is in those spending patterns – enabling them to offer a card that becomes the customer’s go-to, top-of-wallet offering.

Those transactions aren’t just generating revenue, Paxson noted – they are also building insight that can inform every part of the bank’s offerings.

But top-of-wallet is a status for which many issuers are competing. Making it to the top of the pile is about more than making an offering, she said: “It’s about building the right one – and making sure consumers know it’s there to capitalize on.”

Building The Right Offerings 

There is no silver bullet offering that credit unions can create when it comes to building a competitive card product, but it is becoming increasingly clear where the table stakes lie. Consumers want easy onboarding processes that leave them with a product that works more or less ready to roll the minute they are approved. Apple, Paxon pointed out, has its cards provisioned into its mobile wallet within minutes – and the expectation for speedy, smooth function is something anyone building a digital payment offering must consider.

The experience has to be rewarding, she said – but credit unions also have to get more creative about building out those rewards in terms. It’s not just about throwing out some points, but about matching the rewards to particular customers. CO-OP has a San Francisco client, for example, who has set one of its rewards offerings so that the cash back goes directly to their customers’ student loans.

“Payment products offer an opportunity to live their mission through their portfolio of products,” Paxson said. “The big overall question is how are we using our payments to meet the needs of our customers to help them manage their financial lives, as well as all the things they are cobbling together on their phones today.”

Consumers are comfortable doing that, she said, because the emergence of smartphones has made it relatively easy and straightforward. If they can also do more of that from a hub via their relationship with their credit union, they will – but the offering has to be there, correctly constructed and properly managed.

Getting Started 

Because there are many right answers depending on a credit union’s specific goals, the place to start is with the data they already have, Paxson said – an inventory of the solutions they already offer and an idea of the growth opportunity they are targeting. When a CU has a clear handle on those three things, it can start building out and measuring results. From there, Paxson noted, it is a lot of data management and following – and then designing from where it leads.

“What we know is that consumers want to be able to move and manage money, they want transparency and control, they want to be rewarded for their behavior and they want the design to be instant and invisible,” she said. “When you’ve built your systems out and are measuring against those things, you’re doing the right thing.”

The $500B Consumer Lifestyle Opportunity Credit Unions Are Missing

Credit unions (CUs) have a bit of asymmetry in their relationships with their customers. On one hand, as PYMNTS data shows, customers very much like their credit unions, and are loyal to them. PYMNTS found that 65 percent of members chose their CUs because they trusted them, 58.4 percent reported being “extremely” satisfied with them and 60.8 percent said they would not leave their CUs for different financial institutions (FIs).

The problem is that while customers might be perfectly satisfied with their credit unions, they are still stepping out on them – the majority of members say that their primary relationship is with another financial services provider.

And that is an indication that it’s time for credit unions to start thinking differently, Samantha Paxson, chief experience officer at CO-OP Financial Services, told Karen Webster in the latest edition of the PYMNTS Masterclass Series. As she pointed out, they need to think differently about payments, about digitization and about how they are actively building to meet their customers’ needs and expectations.

“The future is in understanding your customer, what they are trying to do, and then designing solutions for the day-to-day member lifestyle – because that is how you create greater engagement,” Paxson told Webster.

Centralizing The Payments Experience

The historical focus of credit unions has been consumer lending, with a focus on providing the lowest rates to customers. That’s a perfectly good bedrock upon which to build their mission, Paxson said – but what CUs have been slower to understand is that in the intersection between lending and day-to-day lifestyle connections, there lies a payments opportunity.

As a result, she said, although credit unions are offering credit card products, they aren’t a central focus. At best, they are often relegated to the status of a sideline revenue channel. That is evident in the difference between the top three banks, where credit cards represent roughly 26 percent of loan volume, and credit unions, where they represent a little over 6 percent.

“There is a massive tendency toward ‘setting it and forgetting it’ somewhere on the side, despite the fact that it is both an important strategic growth driver and an engagement,” said Paxson.

Today, that means leaving $500 billion in incremental revenue on the table, she noted – a figure that will swell to north of $1 trillion before the end of the decade. And perhaps more important than the dollars-and-cents revenue loss is the missed opportunity to make daily connections with customers. Like most working people, Paxson told Webster, by 9:35 in the morning, she has already used her payment card six separate times in a mix of in-person, mobile and web-based transactions. Among the best places for an FI to gain insight into its customer base is in those spending patterns – enabling them to offer a card that becomes the customer’s go-to, top-of-wallet offering.

Those transactions aren’t just generating revenue, Paxson noted – they are also building insight that can inform every part of the bank’s offerings.

But top-of-wallet is a status for which many issuers are competing. Making it to the top of the pile is about more than making an offering, she said: “It’s about building the right one – and making sure consumers know it’s there to capitalize on.”

Building The Right Offerings 

There is no silver bullet offering that credit unions can create when it comes to building a competitive card product, but it is becoming increasingly clear where the table stakes lie. Consumers want easy onboarding processes that leave them with a product that works more or less ready to roll the minute they are approved. Apple, Paxon pointed out, has its cards provisioned into its mobile wallet within minutes – and the expectation for speedy, smooth function is something anyone building a digital payment offering must consider.

The experience has to be rewarding, she said – but credit unions also have to get more creative about building out those rewards in terms. It’s not just about throwing out some points, but about matching the rewards to particular customers. CO-OP has a San Francisco client, for example, who has set one of its rewards offerings so that the cash back goes directly to their customers’ student loans.

“Payment products offer an opportunity to live their mission through their portfolio of products,” Paxson said. “The big overall question is how are we using our payments to meet the needs of our customers to help them manage their financial lives, as well as all the things they are cobbling together on their phones today.”

Consumers are comfortable doing that, she said, because the emergence of smartphones has made it relatively easy and straightforward. If they can also do more of that from a hub via their relationship with their credit union, they will – but the offering has to be there, correctly constructed and properly managed.

Getting Started 

Because there are many right answers depending on a credit union’s specific goals, the place to start is with the data they already have, Paxson said – an inventory of the solutions they already offer and an idea of the growth opportunity they are targeting. When a CU has a clear handle on those three things, it can start building out and measuring results. From there, Paxson noted, it is a lot of data management and following – and then designing from where it leads.

“What we know is that consumers want to be able to move and manage money, they want transparency and control, they want to be rewarded for their behavior and they want the design to be instant and invisible,” she said. “When you’ve built your systems out and are measuring against those things, you’re doing the right thing.”

Blockchain in Retail Market Growing at CAGR of 96.4% | Key Players IBM, SAP, Microsoft, Cegeka, Oracle

Blockchain in Retail Market Growing at CAGR of 96.4% | Key Players IBM, SAP, Microsoft, Cegeka, Oracle

Blockchain in Retail Market Growing at CAGR of 96.4% | Key Players IBM, SAP, Microsoft, Cegeka, Oracle

IBM (US), SAP (Germany), Microsoft (US), Oracle (US), AWS (US), Bitfury (the Netherlands), Auxesis Group (India), Cegeka (the Netherlands), BTL (Canada), Guardtime (Estonia), CoinBase (US), loyyal (US), Sofocle (India), BigchainDB (Germany), RecordsKeeper (Spain), BitPay (US), Abra (US), Reply (Italy), Provenance (UK)…
Blockchain in Retail Market by Provider, Application (Compliance Management, Identity Management, Loyalty & Rewards Management, Payment, Smart Contracts, and Supply Chain Management), Organization Size, and Region – Global Forecast to 2023

MarketsandMarkets expects the global Blockchain In Retail Market to grow from USD 80.0 million in 2018 to USD 2,339.5 million by 2023, at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 96.4% during the forecast period. Blockchain is a distributed and decentralized ledger that facilitates collaboration and trust in the internet space. The blockchain technology provides secured sharing of information while making it transparent and immutable for all the participants. The integration of the blockchain technology in the retail sector gradually increasing to enhance business decision-making process, ease of compliance and regulations management, and reduce the overall costs.

Blockchain in Retail Market Growing at CAGR of 96.4% | Key Players IBM, SAP, Microsoft, Cegeka, Oracle 1

Rapidly transforming business processes across the retail sector, high adoption of blockchain technology for various application areas, such as smart contracts, identity management, and compliance management, and increasing venture funding and investments in the blockchain technology would provide growth opportunities for blockchain technology vendors.

Download PDF Brochure @ https://www.marketsandmarkets.com/pdfdownloadNew.asp?id=79569008

The application segment includes compliance management, identity management, payments, smart contracts, loyalty and rewards management, supply chain management, and others (anti-counterfeiting, advertising, and consumer data management). The loyalty and rewards management is expected to be the fastest growing application in this marketspace. The blockchain technology benefits retailers in numbers of ways and eliminates reasons of inefficiency such as poor integration of reward programs, inflexibility of reward structures and lack of visibility. The loyalty and rewards management plays an important role in the retail sector as it allows tracking and management of reward points without adding frustration and friction among customers. The blockchain technology can be successfully implemented for the real-time liquidity of rewards points is easier and swappable between customers and retailers, therefore the global retail vertical is adopting the technology.

The application providers segment is estimated to hold the highest market size in 2018. Application providers are third-party entities that distribute and manage blockchain solutions for customers across the retail sector. Blockchain solutions are outsourced to meet the technological needs of businesses. Retailers often require certain applications, such as CRM, for their businesses, application providers provide such solutions over a network using standard protocols. These providers help enterprises implement the blockchain technology to fulfill the increasing need for customer services. The companies’ increasing adoption of the blockchain technology applications is responsible for this segment’s growth.

In terms of geographic coverage, the blockchain in retail market has been segmented into 5 regions, namely, North America, Asia Pacific (APAC), Europe, the Middle East and Africa (MEA), and Latin America. North America is estimated to account for the highest share of the overall market in 2018. North America is considered the most advanced region in technology adoption and infrastructure. The wide presence of key industry players of blockchain technology solutions in this region is the main driving factor for the blockchain in retail market. Furthermore, APAC is expected to grow at the highest rate during the forecast period, due to the increasing investments in the blockchain technology solutions to change the business processes in the retail sector.

Speak to Our Expert Analyst @ https://www.marketsandmarkets.com/speaktoanalystNew.asp?id=79569008

Major players in the blockchain in retail market include IBM (US), SAP (Germany), Microsoft (US), Oracle (US), AWS (US), Bitfury (the Netherlands), Auxesis Group (India), Cegeka (the Netherlands), BTL (Canada), Guardtime (Estonia), CoinBase (US), loyyal (US), Sofocle (India), BigchainDB (Germany), RecordsKeeper (Spain), BitPay (US), Abra (US), Reply (Italy), Provenance (UK), ModulTrade (UK), Blockverify (UK), OGYDocs (Israel), Warranteer (Israel) and Blockchain Foundary (Singapore). These players have adopted various growth strategies, such as partnerships, agreements, and collaborations; and new product launches, to further expand their presence in the global blockchain in retail market. The strategy of partnerships and new product launches has been the most dominating growth strategy adopted by major players from 2016 to 2018 to innovate on their offerings and broaden their customer base.

Media Contact
Company Name: MarketsandMarkets
Contact Person: Mr. Sanjay Gupta
Email: Send Email
Phone: 18886006441
Address:630 Dundee Road Suite 430
City: Northbrook
State: IL 60062
Country: United States
Website: https://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/blockchain-in-retail-market-79569008.html

Tracksmith: Taking DTC Running From Heartbreak Hill To The Global Market

Bostonians take their running seriously.

Boston is home to the world’s “statement race” — the Boston Marathon. There was a time when you trained there if you considered yourself a serious runner, although Kenya has taken that spot.

And although Runner’s World magazine had the nerve to rank it No. 3 in the best running cities in the U.S., you’d be hard-pressed to find a Chowdahead who doesn’t think Boston is the running capital of the world.

Matt Taylor, co-founder and CEO of running apparel brand Tracksmith has found himself and his company a little slice of Boston’s running history. Go to his Back Bay retail location on any given Sunday morning, and “the champion of the running class” is hosting up to 150 people fresh off a long group run, drinking coffee and perusing his branded collection of high-wick shorts, running sweatshirts, pants and other gear that he has taken from a hobby to a solid direct-to-consumer (D2C) sports brand poised to break out into new categories and new sales plateaus in 2020.

“Right now, we’re in the peak training period for the Boston Marathon, which is coming up in April,” Taylor said. “Yes, we will draw a crowd at the store. You know, all these people may or may not be shopping, but we’re certainly making an impression, and they’re having a good experience. And although we don’t have sort of a control group to cast against, I mean we certainly feel like there’s a lesson in the business when we’re doing those things well.”

Lately, Taylor and Tracksmith have been doing several things well. The eCommerce-physical location hybrid is marking 2020 with a presence at the world’s leading marathons throughout the year (New York City, Boston, Berlin, Tokyo and London) and is seeing a bounce in sales tied to a comeback in high-performance running shoes, which is a market Taylor is planning on entering with the Tracksmith brand. For now, Tracksmith is riding an athleisure wave.

“We are firmly in an athleisure lifestyle cycle,” said Matt Powell, vice president and senior industry advisor for The NPD Group, as well as a sports industry expert.

Why?

“At a macro level, I just think that historically, society has sort of proven out multiple times that when times are uncertain and people feel maybe higher levels of stress than they normally would, running is something that usually has an uptick, and that’s why running has traditionally been recession proof,” Taylor said. “Because when we’ve had periods of economic or societal uncertainty, running is one thing that people can sort of control. I think that will carry into 2020.”

Taylor said marketing activities reflect his current scale as a small D2C brand. Digital advertising is placed predominantly on Facebook and Instagram. Direct mail pieces and a catalog dominate acquisition and retention efforts. For several years, Tracksmith has activated pop-up shops at the major marathons, with Tokyo added this year. Content marketing is a staple of the website, with Taylor himself conducting interviews with runners of local and national prominence. The photos shown on the site are light on drama and aesthetics. The subjects look like they’re running hard and sweating, not posing.

“Everything we do is really approached from a sort of storytelling perspective,” he said. “That’s something that our team does extremely well. I think that even our emails and our on-site content is aimed at seasonal launches or capsule collections, and those things just work very well for us.”

Taylor founded Tracksmith in 2014. He was previously the director of sprinter Usain Bolt’s official iOS game, and prior to that he was head of marketing for the running, training and fitness unit at PUMA. He studied psychology and biology at Yale. He is also on the board of directors at Shoefitr Inc., a shoe fitting technology that was recently purchased by Amazon.

He said his time at PUMA showed him that regardless of how much apparel showed promise as a category, footwear always won. So, when he started Tracksmith, he put some new instincts to work.

“Having worked at a big company, you sort of see internally where the resources go, and by resources I mean both money, time and talents,” he said. “And so, footwear was always king until about five years ago, when apparel started to grow, but the resources didn’t. I saw an opportunity to say, ‘Yes, there are these brands that are very big and great at what they do, but they’re not spending too much time thinking about apparel.’”

So Tracksmith was born and now thrives as a D2C brand. Taylor is comfortable with that status.

“Certainly, the bigger brands that have relied on wholesale accounts have quit and rightfully so,” he said. “They focus on their own direct channels, whether that’s retail stores or their eCommerce platforms. But the ones that are driven by wholesale, well, you know, it’s hard. It’s trying to turn that tanker around in the ocean versus a little speedboat that can move overnight.”

Right now, Taylor has a speedboat. He’s betting he has enough gas in it to compete in the big race.

Tracksmith: Taking DTC Running From Heartbreak Hill To The Global Market

Bostonians take their running seriously.

Boston is home to the world’s “statement race” — the Boston Marathon. There was a time when you trained there if you considered yourself a serious runner, although Kenya has taken that spot.

And although Runner’s World magazine had the nerve to rank it No. 3 in the best running cities in the U.S., you’d be hard-pressed to find a Chowdahead who doesn’t think Boston is the running capital of the world.

Matt Taylor, co-founder and CEO of running apparel brand Tracksmith has found himself and his company a little slice of Boston’s running history. Go to his Back Bay retail location on any given Sunday morning, and “the champion of the running class” is hosting up to 150 people fresh off a long group run, drinking coffee and perusing his branded collection of high-wick shorts, running sweatshirts, pants and other gear that he has taken from a hobby to a solid direct-to-consumer (D2C) sports brand poised to break out into new categories and new sales plateaus in 2020.

“Right now, we’re in the peak training period for the Boston Marathon, which is coming up in April,” Taylor said. “Yes, we will draw a crowd at the store. You know, all these people may or may not be shopping, but we’re certainly making an impression, and they’re having a good experience. And although we don’t have sort of a control group to cast against, I mean we certainly feel like there’s a lesson in the business when we’re doing those things well.”

Lately, Taylor and Tracksmith have been doing several things well. The eCommerce-physical location hybrid is marking 2020 with a presence at the world’s leading marathons throughout the year (New York City, Boston, Berlin, Tokyo and London) and is seeing a bounce in sales tied to a comeback in high-performance running shoes, which is a market Taylor is planning on entering with the Tracksmith brand. For now, Tracksmith is riding an athleisure wave.

“We are firmly in an athleisure lifestyle cycle,” said Matt Powell, vice president and senior industry advisor for The NPD Group, as well as a sports industry expert.

Why?

“At a macro level, I just think that historically, society has sort of proven out multiple times that when times are uncertain and people feel maybe higher levels of stress than they normally would, running is something that usually has an uptick, and that’s why running has traditionally been recession proof,” Taylor said. “Because when we’ve had periods of economic or societal uncertainty, running is one thing that people can sort of control. I think that will carry into 2020.”

Taylor said marketing activities reflect his current scale as a small D2C brand. Digital advertising is placed predominantly on Facebook and Instagram. Direct mail pieces and a catalog dominate acquisition and retention efforts. For several years, Tracksmith has activated pop-up shops at the major marathons, with Tokyo added this year. Content marketing is a staple of the website, with Taylor himself conducting interviews with runners of local and national prominence. The photos shown on the site are light on drama and aesthetics. The subjects look like they’re running hard and sweating, not posing.

“Everything we do is really approached from a sort of storytelling perspective,” he said. “That’s something that our team does extremely well. I think that even our emails and our on-site content is aimed at seasonal launches or capsule collections, and those things just work very well for us.”

Taylor founded Tracksmith in 2014. He was previously the director of sprinter Usain Bolt’s official iOS game, and prior to that he was head of marketing for the running, training and fitness unit at PUMA. He studied psychology and biology at Yale. He is also on the board of directors at Shoefitr Inc., a shoe fitting technology that was recently purchased by Amazon.

He said his time at PUMA showed him that regardless of how much apparel showed promise as a category, footwear always won. So, when he started Tracksmith, he put some new instincts to work.

“Having worked at a big company, you sort of see internally where the resources go, and by resources I mean both money, time and talents,” he said. “And so, footwear was always king until about five years ago, when apparel started to grow, but the resources didn’t. I saw an opportunity to say, ‘Yes, there are these brands that are very big and great at what they do, but they’re not spending too much time thinking about apparel.’”

So Tracksmith was born and now thrives as a D2C brand. Taylor is comfortable with that status.

“Certainly, the bigger brands that have relied on wholesale accounts have quit and rightfully so,” he said. “They focus on their own direct channels, whether that’s retail stores or their eCommerce platforms. But the ones that are driven by wholesale, well, you know, it’s hard. It’s trying to turn that tanker around in the ocean versus a little speedboat that can move overnight.”

Right now, Taylor has a speedboat. He’s betting he has enough gas in it to compete in the big race.

Health Scholars Delivers Cloud-Based, VR-Ready Training Platform With VR Simulations, Simulation Management, And Readiness Reporting Solutions

Health Scholars Delivers Cloud-Based, VR-Ready Training Platform With VR Simulations, Simulation Management, And Readiness Reporting Solutions

Health Scholars was founded by healthcare professionals who recognized the need to advance immersive education and clinical training effectiveness. Below is our recent interview with Dr. Brian Gillett, President & Chief Medical Officer at Health Scholars:

Health Scholars Delivers Cloud-Based, VR-Ready Training Platform With VR Simulations, Simulation Management, And Readiness Reporting Solutions 2

Q: Could you provide our readers with a brief introduction to Health Scholars?

A: Our mission is to advance healthcare simulation through virtualization, making experience-based training scalable, accessible and affordable for public health and safety professionals to help reduce medical errors and improve patient safety.

Based in Denver, Colorado we’ve developed an all-in-one platform for the management, delivery and analysis of blended medical training, including VR simulations. Our VR applications scale critical resuscitation, peri-operative and obstetrical training, and enables repeatable practice of proper workflows as well as critical soft skills like communications, situational awareness and critical thinking.

Q: You’ve recently raises $17m in Series D round. What do you plan to do with those funds?

A: The new investment round will enable us to continue to introduce and expand new virtual technologies in both the Hospital and Public Safety market allowing for greater accessibility, scalability and immersion at up 80% less cost than traditional simulation training methods.

Specifically, we will use funding to expand our VR content library, further develop the virtual learning platform to facilitate enterprise scale deployments and analytics, grow our go-to-market resources and strengthen our IP base.

Health Scholars Delivers Cloud-Based, VR-Ready Training Platform With VR Simulations, Simulation Management, And Readiness Reporting Solutions 3Recommended: Success Plan Media Provides Wide Variety Of Media Relations, Advertising, Marketing Strategies, And Video Content Production Services

Q: You’ve also launched first VR ACLS training simulation for first responders; could you tell us something more?

A: We released our Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) VR training in January to help address the specific training needs of EMS providers and was made possible with a Public Safety Innovation Accelerator Program User Interface grant from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Partnership and the State of Colorado’s Advanced Industries Accelerator Program. The VR simulation was designed in accordance with American Heart Association guidelines and input from local EMS partners, allowing providers to play the role of the team lead running an in-home code scenario. Providers receive thirteen total scenarios that reflect cardiac and non-cardiac arrest scenarios and using voice direction must identify rhythms and direct virtual team members to shock, give meds, and/or perform CPR as necessary. The simulation provides extensive practice on communication, situational awareness, decision-making and competencies such as accurate hospital notification all while undergoing real-world distractions they’d experience in the field.

ACLS certification is required every two years, so effective, scalable training is vital for all EMS agencies to provide. For small or rural agencies, the volume of cardiac emergencies can be inconsistent, creating a need for affordable refresher training. By virtualizing ACLS training, agencies of all sizes can easily integrate an immersive training modality, plus VR easily scales to any number of providers, is at least 50% less than the cost of traditional physical simulation and provides performance reporting that is actionable.

Q: What types of training do you provide to your clients?

A: We currently provide three VR simulation applications: ACLS for First Responders, ACLS for In-Hospital Clinicians, and Fire in The OR which trains clinicians on proper surgical fire prevention and management to mitigate risks and reduce liability costs. This year we’ll be releasing several more simulations focused on resuscitation, obstetrical emergency, peri-operative, and emergency preparedness training.

Health Scholars Delivers Cloud-Based, VR-Ready Training Platform With VR Simulations, Simulation Management, And Readiness Reporting Solutions 4Recommended: An Interview With Elaine Hau, The Founder And CEO Of Luxury Fashion Rentals

Q: Why VR? Why now?

A: Scale and frequency issues are what virtual reality can help address. And in a world of ever-increasing healthcare costs, geographic expansion, and population growth the need for highly trained medical professionals is exponential. VR enables professional medical providers to practice competencies in real-world, risk-free settings while enabling instructors to see decisions and how they then react to the consequences. VR finally affords the healthcare sector a mechanism for scaling high-impact experiential training and we’re keen to help find training gaps and improve survival rates across the board within different areas of engagement from medical professionals.

Q: What are your plans for the future?

A: We will continue to focus on the often-overlooked low occurrence/high risk clinical situations where effective training undoubtedly mitigates threats to patient safety. Ultimately our vision is to be a catalyst for clinical training transformation. There is a massive evidence standard in health care when it comes to devices and drugs; however, this standard is lacking when it comes to ensuring the maintenance of critical competencies for people who provide the care. This is due to the practical impossibility of rolling out high yield trainings with a meaningful cadence of participation across health systems. Also, there’s no objective way to measure training effectiveness at scale across large provider populations. Thus, we are changing this by making available, to any size healthcare or public safety organization, a comprehensive enterprise platform for managing, orchestrating and scaling XR training content. Our platform can disseminate performance metrics and trends as well as enable cross disciplinary collaboration and analysis, which is necessary to provided targeted training. Health Scholars is not just a VR training company. We’re a medical innovations company, so our future will consist of finding new ways to scale and standardize immersive learning and relevant performance data and demonstrating how XR training positively impacts patient outcomes.

Activate Social Media:
facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin

The post Health Scholars Delivers Cloud-Based, VR-Ready Training Platform With VR Simulations, Simulation Management, And Readiness Reporting Solutions appeared first on SuperbCrew.