Category: Iowa DOT

Iowa DOT Closes I-29 and State Roads Again Due to Rising Water

ATLANTIC, Iowa- The Iowa Department of Transportation today closed Interstate 29 in the Council Bluffs area, and from Highway 34 to the Missouri State line. The closures are due to rising flood waters, after more rain pounded the midwest.

“Right now we just closed I 29 from US 34 south to the Missouri border water was approaching the roadway once again,” said Scott Suhr of the Iowa DOT District 4 office. “I think it tries everybody’s patience, whether you’re a motorist, or a farmer, or person that’s trying to move freight, or commute every day it’s frustrating to all of us.”

Flooding has closed Interstate 29 between exit 61 (I-680 near Crescent) and exit 71 (I-680 near Loveland) according to a news release from Iowa Department of Transportation. A detour is in operation for this area.

The Iowa DOT also has issued a list of roads closed in Iowa due to flooding.

With all the rainfall across Iowa, there are several other road closures in place. These include:
* I-29 in Council Bluffs (local detour in place)
* S. 34 from I-29 to the Nebraska border
* Iowa 2 from I-29 to the Nebraska border
* All I-29 entrance and exit ramps south of U.S. 34
Other Iowa roads currently closed due to flooding:
* S. 169 near Adel
* S. 65 near Lucas
* Iowa 92 near Oskaloosa
* Iowa 21 near Belle Plaine
* Iowa 130 near Plainview
* S. 67 in Davenport

The Department of Transportation has ways for you to get information from their news release:

Travelers should check 511ia.org, the Iowa 511 mobile app or call 511 (within Iowa) or 800-288-1047 (nationwide) for up-to-date closure information on state-owned roadways across Iowa. Closures due to flooding can be viewed by turning on the incident layer on the online map and mobile app.
For the latest in flooding information and recovery resources, as well as an image gallery showing the flood damage and recovery efforts go to https://floods2019.iowa.gov/.

Iowa 415 Reduced to One Lane Monday

POLK COUNTY, Iowa – A major project ten years in the making begins Monday morning near Saylor Township and Ankeny.

Iowa DOT is demolishing the bridge off of 66th Avenue and Iowa 415, and transforming it into an “At Grade” intersection with traffic signals.

Iowa DOT Transportation Engineer Associate Clayton Burke said many large semi-trucks have been running in to the bridge and getting stuck.

During construction, Iowa 415 will be reduced to one lane on both sides and people will not have access to 66th Avenue.

Burke said residents in the area will also have a new route to get to their homes.

“We are actually building temporary access routes. So we are building pretty much what are gravel roads, to their houses for them so they can still have access in and out of 66th Avenue,” Burke said.

A detour route is in place for people. If you are coming in from the east side, Iowa DOT will send you up north on 69 to Oralabor Road. If you are coming from the west side, Iowa DOT will send you up north on NW 26th Street to Oralabor Road.

“Those will be across the road at Iowa 415. We will also have barricades that say road to through traffic at 69and at NW 6th drive,” Burke said.

Burke said the construction can last up until November, depending on weather conditions.

Ankeny to Des Moines Route Closing Monday until Late Fall

POLK COUNTY, Iowa – A major project ten years in the making begins Monday morning near Saylor Township and Ankeny.

Iowa DOT is demolishing the bridge off of 66th Avenue and Iowa 415, and transforming it into an “At Grade” intersection with traffic signals.

Iowa DOT Transportation Engineer Associate Clayton Burke said many large semi-trucks have been running in to the bridge and getting stuck.

During construction, Iowa 415 will be reduced to one lane on both sides and people will not have access to 66th Avenue.

Burke said residents in the area will also have a new route to get to their homes.

“We are actually building temporary access routes. So we are building pretty much what are gravel roads, to their houses for them so they can still have access in and out of 66th Avenue,” Burke said.

A detour route is in place for people. If you are coming in from the east side, Iowa DOT will send you up north on 69 to Oralabor Road. If you are coming from the west side, Iowa DOT will send you up north on NW 26th Street to Oralabor Road.

“Those will be across the road at Iowa 415. We will also have barricades that say road to through traffic at 69and at NW 6th drive,” Burke said.

Burke said the construction can last up until November, depending on weather conditions.

Western Iowa Flooded Road Rebuild Could Top $90 Million

COUNCIL BLUFFS, Iowa- Rebuilding the Interstates and state highways damaged in Iowa could cost around $70-90 million dollars, according to the Iowa Department of Transportation.

The DOT directors from Nebraska and Iowa held a joint news conference to update the public on road status, and planned construction.

“Events like this require an enormous amount of coordination we certainly is DOT’s don’t work independently or in a vacuum,” said Mark Lowe, Director of the Iowa Department of Transportation.

“I think that’s one of the reasons were here today in our teams are meeting today and so frequently citizens don’t care what side of the river there on they need the system to work seamlessly,” said Kyle Schenweis, Director of the Nebraska Department of Transportation.

Lowe told of work done to reopen I-680 west of I-29. He said there is a stretch of I-29 north of Council Bluffs where the road is still closed, due to a box culvert being washed away.

“Down to the southern segments that have more damage, a look at US 34, indicates we got significant pavement damage,” said Lowe. “The next segment is Iowa 2, this is an area where we still have roadways that remain underwater, has been going down or getting closer, I think the good news here is we’ve done a high-level assessment of the damages and we think the damages are minor.”

Lowe said that funds used for emergency road repairs will not impact other Iowa DOT road projects. Those funds come from a special disaster fund.