Category: Mumps

Utah boy gets mumps despite vaccination

HEBER CITY, Utah — A family is warning others after their son fell ill with the mumps virus, despite being up to date on his immunizations.

“I would consider this the worst sickness I’ve had,” said 11-year-old Finn Price.

The fifth grader was sick last Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.

“My jaw really, really hurt,” Finn said. “Chewing a lot of harder, crunchy foods was out of the question. The fever didn’t help at all.”

At first, doctors didn’t diagnose Finn with mumps. When a test returned a positive result, he and his parents were shocked.

“C’mon, he can’t have the mumps,” said Finn’s mom, Bethe Price, when asked about her reaction to the test result.

She wants families to know the mumps vaccine isn’t 100% effective.

“Unfortunately, vaccines like everything else in this world, is not a guarantee,” said Dr. Mary Tipton, a pediatrician at Copper View Medical Center.

Tipton emphasizes the importance of vaccinations in preventing large outbreaks of dangerous diseases.

Finn’s parents plan to make sure he gets any needed boosters.

“I don’t see the point in not having immunizations,” Kyle Price, Finn’s father, said.

“Definitely get your kids immunized. We’ll keep doing that, for sure,” said Bethe Price.

The Wasatch County Health Department released a statement, warning families with children at Old Mill Elementary of possible exposure.

The virus has an incubation period of up to 18 days, so there is a chance people may have contracted it and not yet be aware.

According to the Wasatch County Health Department’s statement, symptoms include pain in the cheek or jaw, fever, difficulty eating, tiredness and headache.

More mumps in Utah: Confirmed case in Utah County, suspected case in Wasatch County

WASATCH COUNTY, Utah – Mumps cases in Utah are nearly at quintuple the yearly average after two more instances of the virus were announced Wednesday.

Two more instances of the mumps virus came to light Wednesday with a confirmed case in Utah County and a suspected case in Wasatch County.

The first was a confirmed case impacting an un-vaccinated adult in Utah County and the Utah County Health Department said they believe they contracted it from someone who was infected, they are working to notify anyone they may have been in contact with during their infectious period. The incubation period lasts between 16-18 days, infected persons can be contagious starting two days prior to showing symptoms and up until five days after.

The second, a suspected case out of Wasatch County, impacting a student at Old Mill Elementary who was fully immunized.

The boy’s mother sent a statement to FOX 13 saying in part, “I felt like I needed to let out community know because 1) if you see the same symptoms in you or your kids, that it’s possible it could be mumps and 2) even if you are vaccinated it could be mumps.”

The vaccine is not 100% effective. According to the health department, it is 78% effective if you’ve had one dose and 88% effective if you’ve had two doses.

The Wasatch and Utah County Health Departments do not believe these cases are related and do not believe anyone else was infected.

According to the Utah Department of Health, the state typically sees two-to-three mumps cases per year. The announcement Wednesday brings the total number of confirmed cases for 2019 to 14, not including the suspected case.

“Sometimes we get a false sense of security thinking, ‘Oh we don’t get mumps or measles or rubella or other infections like that anymore,’” said Lisa Guerra, an epidemiologist with the Utah County Health Department. “We still can get these cases and it’s important to receive your immunizations.”

Mumps is an infectious disease and is not treatable. Symptoms can include swelling of the periodic glands, which is the area right below and in front of the ear, as well as pain and fever.

The health department said in serious cases it can cause men to become sterile and it can also cause deafness.

If you believe you are showing symptoms of mumps, the health department asks that you call your healthcare provider and stay home.

The health department said the vaccination is still the best method of prevention. For more information on the mumps vaccination, contact the Utah Immunization Hotline at 1-800-257-0659.

Health department to give update on mumps cases in Utah

SALT LAKE CITY – The Utah Department of Health will give an update on the number of mumps cases in the state Thursday morning.

That update is set for 10:30 a.m.

The North Sanpete County School District excluded unvaccinated students from school last month due to mumps.

A student in the district was diagnosed with mumps in April, and a second person was diagnosed within the county.

The ban on unvaccinated students was triggered by state law and students can return with proof of immunization or once 26 days have elapsed since the last confirmed case.

Sam Ray, Superintendent of North Sanpete County Schools, said at one of the schools in the district about 10 percent of students were unvaccinated for MMR—measles, mumps and rubella.

The Central Utah Public Health Department said signs and symptoms of mumps include fever, muscle aches, swelling of the salivary glands, and a tender jaw.

They also said the best way to prevent mumps is with a vaccination.

Health department confirms at least six cases of mumps in Utah

SALT LAKE CITY – There are at least six confirmed cases of mumps in Utah, health department officials confirmed Thursday morning.

Mike Grimlie, a public information officer for the Central Utah Public Health Department, said there are now six cases among residents in the northern Sanpete County area.

There are another five potential cases in that region awaiting confirmation from lab tests.

The Utah Department of Health plans to release additional details and statewide numbers for mumps in a press conference scheduled for 10:30 a.m.

Two of the six cases were reported last month. The North Sanpete County School District excluded unvaccinated students from school last month in response.

A student in the district was diagnosed with mumps in April, and a second person was diagnosed within the county.

The ban on unvaccinated students was triggered by state law and students can return with proof of immunization or once 26 days have elapsed since the last confirmed case.

Sam Ray, Superintendent of North Sanpete County Schools, said at one of the schools in the district about 10 percent of students were unvaccinated for MMR—measles, mumps and rubella.

The Central Utah Public Health Department said signs and symptoms of mumps include fever, muscle aches, swelling of the salivary glands, and a tender jaw.

They also said the best way to prevent mumps is with a vaccination.

Utah health officials urge vaccination as 13 cases of mumps confirmed statewide so far this year

SALT LAKE CITY – Health department officials are urging Utahns to vaccinate their children after confirming 13 cases of mumps statewide so far this year.

Mike Grimlie, a public information officer for the Central Utah Public Health Department, said there are now six cases among residents in the northern Sanpete County area.

There are another five potential cases in that region awaiting confirmation from lab tests.

The Utah Department of Health said there have been a total of 13 cases confirmed statewide, including the six in Sanpete County. Specific details about the timelines and locations of those other 7 cases were not immediately available.

Experts said vaccination is the best way to prevent the spread of these diseases

“We’re encouraging parents to get their kids vaccinated, fully vaccinated—work with your pediatricians to ensure that your child is fully vaccinated and we can prevent these diseases,” said Dr. Allyn Nakashima, program manager for the Utah Department of Health.

Two of the six cases in central Utah were reported last month. The North Sanpete County School District excluded unvaccinated students from school last month in response.

A student in the district was diagnosed with mumps in April, and a second person was diagnosed within the county.

The ban on unvaccinated students was triggered by state law, and Thursday officials said excluded students will be allowed back on Monday.

Sam Ray, Superintendent of North Sanpete County Schools, said at one of the schools in the district about 10 percent of students were unvaccinated for MMR—measles, mumps and rubella.

The Central Utah Public Health Department said signs and symptoms of mumps include fever, muscle aches, swelling of the salivary glands, and a tender jaw.

They also said the best way to prevent mumps is with a vaccination.

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