Category: hazmat

Crews declare no danger to public following jet fuel spill at University hospital

SALT LAKE CITY — First responders do not believe there is a threat to the public after a fuel spill at the University of Utah Hospital sent 25 gallons of ‘Jet A’ fuel into two storm drains Friday afternoon.

A semitrailer hauling a tank of jet fuel — which was being used to refill the hospital’s medical helicopter fuel tanks — spilled 25 gallons onto the road behind the hospital, according to Division Chief Ryan Mellor of the Salt Lake City Fire Department.

“As they were uncapping the tank — there’s a dust cap on there — for some reason, when they took the dust cap off, it just started flowing,” Mellor said.

When the fuel started to flow, two men were covered, one completely doused. Mellor said the hospital made it a priority to get the men medical care. They were taken inside for decontamination. Both men are now in ‘Alpha condition’ and are expected to make a full recovery.

When SLCFD hazmat crews responded, they worked to track down the spread.

“If it goes downstream, it can contaminate anything that’s down there,” Mellor said.

The fuel leaked into two storm drains, one of which was believed to connect to the cities water supply.

“The main threat is to the water supply, the water treatment facilities,” Mellor said. “We don’t want it to get down in there.”

Crews worked quickly to determine where the fuel had spread, and they learned both storm drains connect to a retention pond downhill from the hospital.

“Good news is that … anything that gets into that storm drain will be stopped right there,” Mellor said.

The hospital has arranged for a company to come and dispose of the fuel, there is no threat to the public.

56 people suffer respiratory symptoms after chemical spill in Salt Lake City prompts hazmat response

SALT LAKE CITY — Hazmat crews responded to a chemical facility in Salt Lake City after up to 1,000 pounds of product was spilled, leaving a total of 56 potentially exposed patients.

Officials said the spilled product is sulfur dioxide, which can cause respiratory symptoms at high concentrations. 

Eight patients were transported to a local hospital for treatment but have been released, according to Intermountain Healthcare Media Relations Manager Erin Goff.

Some patients were at the facility where the spill occurred, Thatcher Chemical near 1910 West 1230 South, and others were at nearby locations.

Ryan Mellor, a Division Chief with Salt Lake City Fire, said two rail cars bumped into each other, which caused some hoses to tear and product to spill.

Authorities became aware of the spill around 8:40 a.m. after several reports of an odd smell with accompanying respiratory symptoms.

“We were able to trace it down here to here at Thatcher Chemical, where initial reports say there were about 1,000 pounds of a product that was spilled from a rail car,” Mellor said.

Mellor said there are several patients being treated for “respiratory symptoms” in connection with the spill. He said as the wind changes others in the area may experience symptoms and he encouraged people to avoid the area near Fortune Road and Wallace Road.

The leak has been stopped but the product spilled on the ground has not yet been contained. Mellor said between 400 and 1,000 pounds were spilled.

“The incident shouldn’t be getting bigger because the spill has been contained, but now comes the hard part—now comes the work,” Mellor said.

23 suffer respiratory symptoms after chemical spill in Salt Lake City prompts hazmat response

SALT LAKE CITY — Hazmat crews responded to a chemical facility in Salt Lake City after about 1,000 pounds of hazardous product was spilled, leaving nearly two dozen people experiencing symptoms.

Fire authorities said they’ve identified 23 patients so far, six of whom were at Thatcher Chemical where the spill occurred and 17 who were at two other locations near the plant.

Those 23 people are suffering from respiratory issues but specific details about their conditions were not available.

According to a tweet from the Salt Lake City Fire department, the spill occurred at Thatcher Chemical in the area of 1910 west and 1230 south. Fire crews are asking the public to avoid the area.

Things began around 8:40 a.m. with several reports of an odd smell with accompanying respiratory symptoms.

“We were able to trace it down here to here at Thatcher Chemical, where initial reports say there were about 1,000 pounds of a product that was spilled from a rail car,” Ryan Mellor, a Division Chief with Salt Lake City Fire, said.

Mellor said there are several patients being treated for “respiratory symptoms” in connection with the spill. He said as the wind changes others in the area may experience symptoms and he encouraged people to avoid the area near Fortune Road and Wallace Road.

The leak has been stopped but the product spilled on the ground has not yet been contained.

“The incident shouldn’t be getting bigger because the spill has been contained, but now comes the hard part—now comes the work,” Mellor said.

Mellor said fire officials will work to identify the chemical and mitigate the effects of the spill, but another company will be responsible for the clean-up itself.

Fox 13 has a crew at the scene, and this story will be updated as new information becomes available. 

Hazmat crews respond to Butler Middle School

UPDATE: Unified Fire officials said the powder presented no harm to the students.

COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS, Utah – Unified Fire hazmat crews are at Butler Middle School after a white powder was thrown by a student into a bus.

Police said one minor injury was reported and added the substance is protein based and crews are working on an exact identification.

 

This is a developing story. It will be updated as new information becomes available.