Category: flood

Flood watch issued for Little Cottonwood Creek, warning for Duchesne River

SALT LAKE COUNTY, Utah — The National Weather Service has issued a flood warning for the Duchesne River that runs through next week and a flood watch for Little Cottonwood Creek that lasts through Friday morning.

The NWS said the Duchesne River will exceed flood state through parts of Duchesne County and affect lowland areas from Hanna, Utah, to Myton and impact roads, bridges and infrastructure.

U.S. Highway 40, along with state Routes 35, 87 and 208 pass through the flood warning area.

In Salt Lake County, excessive spring snowmelt runoff is expected to push Little Cottonwood Creek to near-flood flow Thursday afternoon, according to the NWS.

The Utah Department of Environmental Quality said the flood watch means there is a potential for flooding based on current forecasts and advised residents to monitor forecasts and be alert for possible flood warnings.

Damage is possible in valley areas adjacent to the creek, the NWS said.

Last week, a 5-year-old boy had to be rescued from Little Cottonwood after he fell into the rushing waters at Murray Park.

Hydrologists with the NWS warned residents to stay out of Big and Little Cottonwood creeks along with the Provo, Duchesne, American Fork and Weber rivers because of snowpack runoff that could continue to rise along with temperatures.

Flood warning issued for Duchesne River; watch issued for Little Cottonwood Creek

SALT LAKE COUNTY, Utah — The National Weather Service has issued a flood warning for the Duchesne River that runs through next week and a flood watch for Little Cottonwood Creek that lasts through Friday morning.

The NWS said the Duchesne River will exceed flood state through parts of Duchesne County and affect lowland areas from Hanna, Utah, to Myton and impact roads, bridges and infrastructure.

U.S. Highway 40, along with state Routes 35, 87 and 208 pass through the flood warning area.

In Salt Lake County, excessive spring snowmelt runoff is expected to push Little Cottonwood Creek to near-flood flow Thursday afternoon, according to the NWS.

The Utah Department of Environmental Quality said the flood watch means there is a potential for flooding based on current forecasts and advised residents to monitor forecasts and be alert for possible flood warnings.

Damage is possible in valley areas adjacent to the creek, the NWS said.

Last week, a 5-year-old boy had to be rescued from Little Cottonwood after he fell into the rushing waters at Murray Park.

Hydrologists with the NWS warned residents to stay out of Big and Little Cottonwood creeks along with the Provo, Duchesne, American Fork and Weber rivers because of snowpack runoff that could continue to rise along with temperatures.

Mississippi Quad Cities Flood Record 22.64 inches Causing Issues Downstream

DAVENPORT, Iowa- The National Weather Service has announced a new all-time preliminary record crest of 22.64 feet at 11:50 AM on Thursday.  This broke the record of 22.63 feet from 1993.  The river is still rising. The record must go through a National Weather Service confirmation process before it is official.

Residents of the small southeast Iowa town of Buffalo, are used to the Mississippi River getting out of it’s banks. They have not seen it go this far before.

This week sandbag walls have been giving way, causing water to creep further into town than ever before.

“Personal residential floodwalls have broke throughout the week with the rising water and the pressure it’s collapsing some of the walls at some of the restaurants at some of the individual residents here in Buffalo,” said Josh Bujalski, of the Buffalo Police Department.

Overnight a sandbag wall gave in at Clark’s Landing Restaurant. No word on how much damage the rushing water did. The restaurant was still using a sump pup to get water out Thursday morning.

“We got a lot of people my family all the neighbors are working together all the way up and down the alley,” said Doug Klaman, a Buffalo resident. “It’s just a nice centrally located spot we can put our boat in here and get it rolling down the alley just do it we can.”

The neighbors had a sandbag station going, and were loading the sandbags onto a boat to ferry them to where they were needed.

Back up river in Davenport the Mississippi River was rising to set new records, but the Figge Art Museum was open for business as usual, even though much of the south side of the structure was surrounded by water. Flood water was pouring into the first floor parking garage, and the lights light the area, even though there was no parking allowed.

“The building was actually built to withstand a flood and so so far so good,” said Tim Schiffer, Executive Director of the Museum. “We’re weathering it, open for business and all our artwork is safe.”

The garage is designed to drain the water, once the flood recedes.

Home Flooded For The First Time in Davenport Flood of 2019

DAVENPORT, Iowa- Flood waters rolled through a portion of downtown Davenport on Tuesday afternoon. Many businesses and downtown dwellers were impacted by the water, but not that many houses.

Wanda Serrano has live here her whole life.

“The only issue I’ve had it’s come up behind that gas station up there one year and that was as far as it got,” said Serrano. “The furnace is gone, the water heater is gone, we’re just trying to keep the water pumping it out so it don’t get to the electric box .”

Volunteers were helping her sandbag the front of the home to keep water out of the first floor.

“We didn’t have a big enough, what do you call them- compression things, -pump so I had to go buy one,” said Serrano. “So I went and got one and they hooked it up.”

Pumps are also running at businesses up and down Second Avenue. This home has a total of five people staying here. Some are thinking about looking for another place to live, soon.

“I’m not sure what I’m gonna do I’m gonna have to find another place to live,” said Doug Neitzel. “City’s probably going to close the house down I’m sure.”

This comes as the crest of the Mississippi River is approaching,

“This is an ongoing thing, comes up all the time but never nothing like this,” said Serrano.