Category: bear

Bear sighting prompts warning from Springville Police

SPRINGVILLE, Utah — Police in Springville warned residents about a bear sighting Wednesday.

Springville Police tweeted about a bear sighting near 1100 South Oakleaf Lane around 10:36 a.m. and asked the public to avoid the area.

Springville Police told Fox 13 the bear was spotted heading up a canyon on the eastern edge of the city.

Police were not able to locate the animal and believe it is in the woods. They notified wildlife officials about the sighting.

The sighting comes one day after a bear was euthanized in Hobble Creek Canyon after an encounter with a Boy Scout troop, during which one boy suffered minor cuts.

No further details about Wednesday’s sighting were immediately available. Fox 13 News will update this story as more details emerge.

Wild Aware Utah provides tips for avoiding animal encounters and advice for what to do in the case of an attack. Click here for their page on bears and see below for their tips on reacting to a bear encounter:

If You Encounter A Bear

  •  Stand your ground. Never back up, lie down or play dead. Stay calm and give the bear a chance to leave. Prepare to use your bear spray or another deterrent.
  • Don’t run away or climb a tree. Black bears are excellent climbers and can run up to 35 miles per hour—you cannot outclimb or outrun them.
  • Know bear behavior. If a bear stands up, grunts, woofs, moans or makes other sounds, it’s not being aggressive. These are ways a bear gets a better look or smell and expresses its interest.

If A Bear Attacks

  •  Use bear spray. Then leave the area. Studies have shown bear spray to be 92 percent successful in deterring bear attacks.
  • Shoot to kill. If you use a firearm, never fire a warning shot-aim for the center of the bear and keep firing until it is dead. Notify the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources immediately.
  • Always fight back. And never give up! People have successfully defended themselves with almost anything: rocks, sticks, backpacks, water bottles and even their hands and feet.

Bear euthanized after boy scratched during Boy Scout campout in Utah County

SPRINGVILLE, Utah – A boy suffered minor cuts after a bear wandered into a campsite in Hobble Creek Canyon Tuesday morning, and wildlife officials have euthanized a bear they believe was responsible.

The bear entered the Buck Hollow Boy Scout Camp in the left fork of Hobble Creek Canyon around 6 a.m.

The campground area is on private property toward the top of the canyon.

This is definitely a spot we will see black bears, said Faith Heaton Jolley with the Utah Division of Wildlife Resoures.  
 
“The scratch wasn’t severe,” Jolley said. “He’s not going to require stitches, it didn’t sound like. He was not hospitalized or transported.”
DWR staff say the small two-year-old male bear was likely just curious of the tent unknowingly placed on an animal trail. 
Dogs tracked and treed the bear about 400 yards from the tent where it was euthanized. DWR’s policy is to kill the wild animal after it injures a person.
“It’s always a little sad when you have to put an animal down,” said DWR Game Mammals Coordinator Daren DeBloois. “That’s why we encourage people to avoid these conflicts.”
Wildlife officials are confident that bear is the one that came to the campsite, and they said it is their policy to euthanize bears that do not demonstrate a fear of humans.

Wild Aware Utah provides tips for avoiding animal encounters and advice for what to do in the case of an attack. Click here for their page on bears and see below for their tips on reacting to a bear encounter:

If You Encounter A Bear

  •  Stand your ground. Never back up, lie down or play dead. Stay calm and give the bear a chance to leave. Prepare to use your bear spray or another deterrent.
  • Don’t run away or climb a tree. Black bears are excellent climbers and can run up to 35 miles per hour—you cannot outclimb or outrun them.
  • Know bear behavior. If a bear stands up, grunts, woofs, moans or makes other sounds, it’s not being aggressive. These are ways a bear gets a better look or smell and expresses its interest.

If A Bear Attacks

  •  Use bear spray. Then leave the area. Studies have shown bear spray to be 92 percent successful in deterring bear attacks.
  • Shoot to kill. If you use a firearm, never fire a warning shot-aim for the center of the bear and keep firing until it is dead. Notify the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources immediately.
  • Always fight back. And never give up! People have successfully defended themselves with almost anything: rocks, sticks, backpacks, water bottles and even their hands and feet.

 

 

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Photos show bear enjoying soak in hot tub at Tennessee cabin

GATLINBURG, Tenn. – A tourist staying near Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Tennessee found an unexpected guest in her hot tub Thursday night – a bear, accompanied by three cubs.

Elizabeth Strickland snapped a few photos of the black bear as it enjoyed a soak on the porch of her Gatlinburg cabin.

“I just had to share with y’all,” she told WBIR. “I was in that same seat 14 hours ago!”

After a dip tub and a bit of play time, Strickland said mama bear and her three cubs moved along without incident.

“Black bears are one of Tennessee’s state treasures and no other animal exemplifies the wilderness experience like them,” according to the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. “They have been called a charismatic mega-fauna and for good reason – everyone from non-hunters, to hunters, to wildlife watchers – we all love bears in our own special ways.”

The agency urges residents and visitors to help “keep them wild and keep them alive.”

Video Shows Bear in Iowa, DNR Says it Could be State’s First ‘Resident’ Bear Since the 1880s

WINNESHIEK COUNTY, Iowa – The Iowa Department of Natural Resources has confirmed the presence of a black bear in northeast Iowa after a hunter captured video of the animal, and the DNR says the sighting is “pretty significant.”

The bear was spotted Saturday by Zach Anderson, who posted a short video he took while turkey hunting near Decorah. Anderson said, “I had a full grown black bear cruise by me 10-15yrds this morning while turkey hunting NE iowa.”

Anderson admitted the sighting was a little scary but still, “One of the coolest things I’ve ever seen!”

Vince Evelsizer, furbearer biologist with the Iowa DNR, says the video is significant because a black bear has been confirmed in the same area in Winneshiek County for the last three years. The DNR thinks it’s likely the same bear, who decided to stay and make Iowa home. That’s a huge development, because though bears are native to the state, the last wild bear that was considered a resident in Iowa was killed in the 1880s.

The DNR gets a handful of reports each year of bear sightings and says those bears probably wandered into Iowa from populations in southeast Minnesota or southwest Wisconsin and usually make their way back to where they came from.

The bear in Winneshiek County is likely the first wild bear to make its home in Iowa in more than 130 years. Evelsizer says the bear hasn’t been a nuisance and has kept out-of-the-way of humans.

There isn’t an established breeding population in Iowa and the DNR does not know whether the Winneshiek County bear is a male or female. Evelsizer says it’s been about 30 years since a confirmed sighting of bear cubs in the state was confirmed.

“It will be interesting to see what happens. If a breeding population becomes reestablished in our state,” says Evelsizer.

Two other confirmed sightings of bears have come in to the DNR this month, one in Delaware County and another in Fayette County. The DNR does not believe those sightings were of the same bear spotted in Winneshiek County.

Black bears are not a protected species in Iowa but the DNR encourages anyone who might come across one to leave it alone and give it space.