Arithmetic Operators in Python

Python is a high-level, versatile, and powerful programming language that is popular for its readability and efficient code structure. This language uses a variety of operators, such as arithmetic, assignment, comparison, logical, and bitwise, to perform common mathematical and logical operations.

This article focuses on one specific type of these operators – the Arithmetic operators. Let’s take a deep dive into understanding what they are, how they function, and some illustrative examples of their usage.

What are Arithmetic Operators?

Arithmetic operators are an important part of any programming language are used to perform mathematical operations like addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, etc. They allow us to perform basic arithmetic calculations between two or more variables, constants, or any valid expressions.

Python includes the following arithmetic operators:

  1. Addition (+)
  2. Subtraction (-)
  3. Multiplication (*)
  4. Division (/)
  5. Modulus (%)
  6. Exponentiation (**)
  7. Floor division (//)

Let’s discuss each of these operators in detail along with examples.

1. Addition (+)

The addition operator (+) adds the values on either side of the operator.

x = 5
y = 10
print(x + y)  # Output: 15

2. Subtraction (-)

The subtraction operator (-) subtracts the right-hand operand from the left-hand operand.

x = 20
y = 10
print(x - y)  # Output: 10

3. Multiplication (*)

The multiplication operator (*) multiplies the values on either side of the operator.

x = 5
y = 10
print(x * y)  # Output: 50

4. Division (/)

The division operator (/) divides the left-hand operand by the right-hand operand. The result is a floating-point number.

x = 10
y = 2
print(x / y)  # Output: 5.0

5. Modulus (%)

The modulus operator (%) returns the remainder when the left-hand operand is divided by the right-hand operand.

x = 10
y = 3
print(x % y)  # Output: 1

6. Exponentiation (**)

The exponentiation operator (**) raises the left-hand operand to the power of the right-hand operand.

x = 2
y = 3
print(x ** y)  # Output: 8

7. Floor division (//)

The floor division operator (//) divides the left operand by the right operand and rounds down the result to the nearest whole number. It’s also called integer division.

x = 10
y = 3
print(x // y)  # Output: 3

Conclusion

In Python, arithmetic operators are fundamental tools for performing mathematical operations. They form the basis for numerical data manipulation, and understanding their functions is crucial to mastering Python programming.

Remember, the order of operations in Python follows the standard mathematical rules of precedence, known as “PEMDAS” or “BODMAS”. This order determines how complex expressions with multiple operators are evaluated. It stands for Parentheses/Brackets, Exponents/Orders, Multiplication and Division, and Addition and Subtraction.

It’s important to remember to utilize parentheses appropriately to ensure that operations are performed in the order you intend. Python’s arithmetic operators are straightforward and intuitive, making Python a great language for both beginners and seasoned programmers.

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